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  1. Thanks for your views, I've ordered a thinline electro-acoustic from Gear4music, my budget is not what it used to be and for what I want it for, it's perfect. There's a lot to be said for budget guitars.
    4 points
  2. @ezbass Life is too short and so the itch must be scratched. Regarding your comment "Things were very different back when I was a mere slip of a lad", I had the same conversation today with my brother, when we started out a `budget' guitar cost a month's wages and guitar pedals cost more than a terraced house in Sheffield, now kids can work in McDonalds for a week and at the weekend they can pick up a decent guitar. It's a different market and I'm happy as now I can go and buy without breaking the bank.
    3 points
  3. I also took delivery of this fantastic Vintage V58JD. It has the Jerry Donahue wiring, strat pickup in the neck. This guitar is really loud acoustically too. Cleans up on the volume knob beautifully. Nice chunky neck, absolute tele spank from the bridge pickup A fine instrument (and a lovely cat called Midnight)
    2 points
  4. Hey all so I just love throwing myself in the deep end, so with absolutely no real experience at all I'm looking to build a kit flying V. Buuuut I am not just intending on doing your basic kit build, where's the fun (pain, stress, misery) in that?! I've bought my own pickups, Seymour Duncan humbucker set (SH4-JB and SH2-N) and I also brought some sheets of diamond pattern metal...my intention is to use the supplied plastic pickguard as a template to cut a new pickguard. The main colour is going to be a distressed, dirty sort of grey and then I'm going to look at getting the metal all dirty and patina'd as well. Really it's not that original, just saw the Schecter V1 Apocalypse
    2 points
  5. I have a Fender Bassman Export 50, and its associated 2 x 15 cab, and can confirm that it is excellent as a guitar rig. I also used it for several years as my bass amp, on big stages and exterior gigs, as well as home practise, and it worked splendidly for that, too. The head is currently with my amp repair man, awaiting pick-up after its major overhaul (re-caps, and a duff o/p tranny...); I'll have to make time to get it, as it was ready before Christmas, but travel wasn't allowed, so... Hmm... Maybe next week..? S'been too long since I used it. Here's a (very...) old photo; it's just visible on the left ... ... and again, with one of my guitars ..
    2 points
  6. “Popping off the neck the neck was a little bit terrifying,” It was horrible watch that bit, it didn’t look like it would end well. It goes to show how solid that method of fixing necks is. I was not liking the restain at all until it was buffed up and then it looked amazing. The guy has some serious woodworking chops (pun unintended) and a seemingly endless supply of tools and workshop space. I liked that but, as warned, the backing track was awful.
    2 points
  7. Rather than start a second youtube thread I decided to put this here. @Dad3353, if you feel it's appropriate you might consider setting up a new thread anyway (which would be fine by me). It's a ground-up Les Paul rebuild, so not exactly a 'who do you watch..', but I hope you'll like it anyway. Caution: most of the video has an awful muzak backing so you might want to mute the audio apart from the start and end sections. Enjoy:
    2 points
  8. I have the mv50 ac, the ac-30 one. It's fabulous, I gigged it last week with my function band, using a telecaster. My bother has one and is very fussy about sound. He also loves it I bought my wife the MV50 higain and the 1x8 vox cab. Also fabulous. They take pedals in front well too I had the gain set to about 1 o'clock and had enough drive for the status quo stuff and when I backed the volume down (on the guitar) it cleans up all sparkly
    2 points
  9. Thanks folks, we’re on it
    2 points
  10. IMG_7061.MOV @ezbass It landed Friday at 11am, I took it to rehearsal that night and I played it in church on Sunday. It's lovely and slim, light on the strap and it plays really well, I'm very, very impressed with it and I'm going to make it my main guitar in church from now on. I attached a brief video but it doesn't want to play for some reason.
    2 points
  11. I must voice my appreciation for @Richie Rich’s speed of GAS satiation, from asking for opinions to pulling the trigger in about 5 hours. We’ll played, Sir. A very worthy effort .
    2 points
  12. Absolutely, they all seem to punch way above their price point. Things were very different back when I was a mere slip of a lad.
    2 points
  13. Err... I think we should break it to him gently lads.
    2 points
  14. Something a little different for Tele tuesday I built this one earlier in the year. Colour is difficult to capture so I've included an under construction photo to show colour and flame : Flame maple neck with binding (was on the Parfitt replica further up the thread but that got a standard neck) Mahogany body with flame maple top stained purple. Faux Binding. Hand rubbed "oil" finish. Neck end is conventional - Gotoh SD91s and Butterfly string tree. Bridge - Wilkinson by Sung Il with steel grooved saddles Pickup - Fender Custom Shop Texas Special Controls - No Switch, custom plate with volume and tone, flat top knobs Merle Haggard-style parchment pickguard. Dunlop flush mount straplocks. A little uncoventional but it suits me nicely. Andy
    2 points
  15. I play for a church and I switch between bass (my main instrument) and acoustic guitar (my backup), I own 3 basses (2 electric and 1 electro-acoustic) and 4 guitars (2 electric, 1 acoustic and 1 electro-acoustic) and a cajon. I always thought of myself as a bassist but now that I own more guitars than basses and I play more acoustic guitar in church than I play bass, I now simply think of myself as a musician. There are kids in our church Worship Team that play multiple instruments and put most adults to shame, one plays drums, bass, keyboards and flute. If you fancy playing something, have a go, give it a try and embrace music as a whole.
    2 points
  16. Update time: The company I bought the neck and body from exchanged the 21 fret flame maple neck for a roasted flamed maple neck with 22 fret rosewood fingerboard. I don't yet own a guitar with a rosewood board so figured this might be a new experiment with the mahogany body. Tonally I don't expect too much of a difference to normal maple, perhaps the rosewood will mean slightly less obtrusive fret noise. Still haven't decided on finish for the HSH body but saw an interesting video on decorating a guitar with gold leaf...could get messy though. I also pulled the trigger on a second Kahler trem, this time an older 4300 X trem (US made version, not Chinese) in chrome. It has a locking function a bit like the Wilkinson. No screws or routing template so they're currently on order from Whammyparts.com and will be sent over with the bridge. This gives me an option of going with either a Wilkinson or Kahler depending on how much whammying I might feel like doing and how much faff there might be in getting the wilkinson to fit the routing provided. The sanding discs, MDF sheet and body filler have arrived so need to collect and maybe start work this afternoon on sanding and the neck pocket template. Speaking of the neck pocket, I've also found some 2mm thick sapele veneer which might work as a shim if glued in place. It's slightly harder than mahogany which is ideal and looks nearly the same. The tricky part will be trying to clamp it securely in place after gluing as the pocket is fairly confined. I also still have a laminated mahogany and maple neck left too. Although originally intended for an MSG shaped build with set in neck joint, it could be adapted for a bolt on build as well.
    2 points
  17. Ok so first things first I wanted to cut my new pickguard out... Plan A was stupid as I clamped the original pickguard to the textures side of the metal which meant it didn't sit straight and my lines were messy... Plan B I engage what little brain I have and clamped the original PG to the back of the metal sheet...where it's nice and smoooooooth!
    2 points
  18. While casually perusing the likes of Aliexpress I discovered someone was selling one piece HSH mahogany strat bodies for something like US$65. So maybe it's time to dip my toe in the water and see how bad things really get. The same seller had flamed maple necks available. "Oh," I thought. "There's a good chance of them fitting if they're made by the same company". [Cue: foreshadowing] So the parts arrived and first impressions were very good. The grain on the flamed maple necks was stunning, one more so than the other. The bodies were incredibly light, the average weight for a mahogany strat body is 2kg, the ones I received clocked in at 1.7kg (with slight figuring) and 1.5kg for a plainer body. However there were issues, as expected. The first was they sent 21 fret necks with truss rod adjustment at the heel. And the bodies didn't have a recess for the truss rod tool. Normally, they wouldn't exchange a neck (despite guarantees on the listing they would) but because I'm in the same country postage was quite cheap, it was feasible. I asked them to exchange one neck for a 22 fret version with the headstock adjustment and more intense flaming. They'll send me a few photos of replacement necks to choose from later today.
    1 point
  19. Not a Tuesday, I know, but.... The Fender Noventa I: If they did a lefty (I don't believe they do at present), I'd be seriously tempted. I've always loved the sound of an LP Junior (Johnny Thunders, Mick Jones), but I feel much more comfortable with a Fender in my hands. This looks like somebody in Fender figured they'd have a go at making a Junior with Fender parts.... Wonderfully brutal, takes the Junior concept and makes it even more utilitarian. If Squier did a lefty of this, it would be an amazing modding platform... This Harley Benton Tele-style with filtertron type pickups looks cool AF: I like how these have something of the Barncaster vibe to them (the three in the middle, anyhow - that green.... yummy), while also that hint of Gretsch-style from the pups. It's be interesting to see one of these with a Bigsby. They do do a lefty I've seen (inevitably in the much less interesting finishes on the outside left and right). I wish they'd put a more conventional, standard headstock on them, though I suspect I could also be won round by the practicality of an inverted headstock (my first electric was a Hendrixed right hander, and the tuners on the bottom were actually much more convenient in many ways). While I've yet to play a Harley Benton, it's really interesting following them online and seeing the brand take established, classic designs and playing around with them like this. A pity that the Brexit upcharges have made it much less practical to take a punt on mail-ordering from Thomann. I'm pretty fixed on knowing what I like nowadays, but I'm wary of paying upcharges and import taxes I can't get back if something turns out not to be right. That aside, though, nice to see a brand emerging at this price point that has a real sense of character to it.
    1 point
  20. i did think of the Bassman when i tried it! i kind of assumed the Bassman was a good guitar amp since it wasn't a very good bass amp, but perhaps it's just a matter of taste - i do prefer a more mid-heavy guitar tone without much treble, so it makes sense a bass amp would work for that. (it might also help that the Barefaced One10 cab has a fairly high treble roll-off for a bass cab.) Ampeg doesn't seem to be the "in thing" for bass at the moment (feels like everyone's moved on to Mesa and MarkBass) but i really like mine.
    1 point
  21. Good evening, xxxxx , and ... Plenty to read and amuse you here, and lots to learn and share.
    1 point
  22. Welcome W-H. I think guitar through a bass amp used to be relatively common (the Fender Bassman being a case in point). I do like those Ampeg Portaflex amps - I’m tempted to try one for myself
    1 point
  23. Hi all. Apologies for vanishing, I've had some issues where I totally underestimated just how tough cutting 2mm aluminium would be. I've been waiting to get hold of some better bits, so I now have a proper jigsaw to attack it with. I've also purchased a proper workbench instead of trying to clamp it to the garden seat! Also I'd realised I'd purchased wood filler, not grain filler so had to get some of that as well! I've also had the stomach bug from hell the last fortnight! And yes, there was an umm deliberate mistake there. Err well done for noticing that if I'm flipping the metal to draw the template on the back then I need to reverse the template!!
    1 point
  24. In my case it was something to watch whilst waiting for my role-playing group to all get online and sort themselves out. It doesn't hurt that she's rather cute, but I found it interesting for a while. I would imagine once you've learnt about singing, stance and how not to do vibrato they become quite samey after a while.
    1 point
  25. I've actually watched a few of those. They're not quite so bad (yes they are bad, but bear with me) when they're done by music professionals as at least you get something resembling an informed opinion, but I drew the line when I saw one in my recommendation list in which a beauty therapist or some such was supposed to be reacting to an acappella song (which, let's be fair, is a bit off the beaten track to start with)...
    1 point
  26. Thanks, I learnt a lot from that.
    1 point
  27. Rick has a lot of interesting stuff to say, but he insists on shouting it instead! There's a newsreader on Wales Today who could be his brother... Rick Beato Random Newsreader
    1 point
  28. nice player, I've seen him a few times with Gambler
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. Robert Rodriguez' 1994 made for tv flick Roadrunners is on Youtube at present - well worth a look if you like some old-school, hardcore rockabilly (and a bunch of Link Wray on the soundtrack too). I've also recently discovered vids from an English guy who lives in Austria - under 'The Guitar Geek'. Seems pretty decent reviews.
    1 point
  31. Only partly, in truth. I've been playing guitars, of many sorts, for over half a century now; I worked in a music shop for several years, too. I can't honestly say I've ever known anyone, least of all myself, that consider the 'tone' of any make of strings, from Cathedral through Ernie Ball to D'Addario and Elixir, passing through many others (Dean Markley, Fender etc...). The gauge will have an effect, but when I changed from Fender Bullets to Elixir, I noticed only that they lasted one heck of a lot longer. Tone..? That's my fingers, and (partly...) the guitar and amp. OK, pedals, too, when used. But the make of strings..? That's a new one on me. Others may have better ears than me (not difficult, especially these daze..!); I'll ask Our Eldest (a luthier and guitarist...) and see what he thinks. No, it's not a factor I've ever considered, tonally. The feel, yes, but not the tone. Blind, I'm not sure anyone could tell what brand is what. Edit: Our Eldest is also surprised by the notion. If there is an effect, it's well down on the list of potential tonal changes, behind fingers (obviously...), pick-ups, potentiometers, amp, jack lead and more. Very difficult to do a real 'A/B' test, too, but our experience is that the brand matters little, tonally. Just sayin'.
    1 point
  32. Something new in Tele World. There are also a number of supporting videos to this (the build).
    1 point
  33. Hey all, How's everyone? Just saying hello and to quickly introduce myself! I'm from Bucks. 38, married and have a 4 yr old son. Been playing various instruments my entire life really but never seem to settle on one! I played the violin for round about 4 years, played bass for about 10, played the drums for 2, o can sorta play piano with one hand and my most recent foray is into the 6-string...I'm been learning about 3 months now. As for my setup, I currently am using a Squire Fender Stratocaster 70s classic HSS in Walnut going through a Black Star ID Core 10. I also have a PRS SE Standard 22 in Translucent Blue, but I'm actually selling that as I just prefer playing the strat! I'm a real fiddler and crafty person (I paint war models, I do paper craft and also own 3 3D printers) so I recently purchased all the bits (I think I need!) to build my own kit guitar...thread to be created when I'm ready to start! Cheers Adam
    1 point
  34. My first week's wages, in a little brown envelope, amounted to 6£, as an apprentice, in '66. It was spent on my first guitar, a Russian-made acoustic classical guitar, strung with steel strings about 1/2" from the 12th fret. The neck joint was a simple horizontal bolt through the heel to the body. I would, of course, need a guitar method book, so I bought, at the same time (from Bell's Music, Hounslow...) the Mickey Baker Complete Course In Jazz Guitar. Here's the book ... ... still available, very inexpensive, from Amazon and elsewhere. Here's Lesson one, on Page Two ... I can't say how many hours, days, months, years I've spent breaking my fingers on those chords. Things improved somewhat when I 'upgraded' to a Hofner President, but it was a hard slog. Happy daze...
    1 point
  35. Spot teh deliberate mistake? Or are you building a lefty?
    1 point
  36. I’ve used the Elixrs in the past, they’re good. They can get a bit hairy with aggressive strumming but, other than that, they were fine. D’Addario do some extended life affairs, but I’ve not used them. https://www.daddario.com/xt-strings/
    1 point
  37. I use Nanoweb 10's; they last years (I have 'rusty' fingers...), although, to be fair, I'm a drummer, so don't play my guitars day in, day out. I have a couple of guitars I've not brought out to see daylight for a couple of years, and when I hauled one out the other day, it was still in tune; I played all afternoon on it (Hofner Verithin...). I used to use Fender Bullets, but they go rusty on me very quickly; well before 'dying'. Soooooo... Elixirs. A tad more expensive at the outset, but far and away cheaper in the long run. I usually wait for a 'pack of three, price for two' offers, for instance. I've just fitted a set on my 12-string electric, too (a pain in the wotsit, changing strings on a 12-string, so I like to do it as little as possible...). Hope this helps...
    1 point
  38. Serial number: V078612 Production year: 1996 or 1997 Made by Fuji-gen,Japan Production year: 1990 or 2000 (Vintage series, except ’52 Telecaster, these have a 5 digit number on the bridge plate) (Factory: Corona, USA) For more accurate annual determination for electric models see:potmeters The only way to correctly date 'Made in USA' models with the prefix 'V' is to check the end of the neck heel on a production date.
    1 point
  39. Update time: When I originally measured the neck I had, I was getting 321mm from nut to 12th fret. Double that and you get the scale length...roughly 25.3 inches. This was a total PITA to adapt as most strat necks are 25.5" so to get all the right sounds, I had to shift the pickup positions in CAD so that they stayed true to their position on the string. However the guy in Canada doing the templates did the same measurements and discovered the necks were actually 25.5"scale. This meant all I really needed to do was a straight copy and paste from the strat block I was using.| Palm meet face. I can only conclude that the tape measure I was using was inaccurate by a few mm but it was a salient lesson in the importance of having reliable measuring tools. Anyway, the templates are being made as I type. The dream of the clean machine is becoming real...
    1 point
  40. Speaking of HSS, I spent quite a bit of time thinking about what to do with these bits and pieces. The mahogany will probably make the instruments too warm for tradition strat sounds (although given how light the mahogany is, that isn't totally certain). But using humbuckers seemed to be a safe bet: Partscaster #1: A bit of a Scream Queen. This will be a light guitar with HSS layout and extra routing out the back of the instrument for the sustainer circuitry like the Ed OBrien strat. I have a sustainer installed in another guitar from NZ which I'm going to remove and reinstall in the lighter partscaster to turn it into a bit of a screamer. Some say basswood is a great wood to use with a sustainer but the first guitar I had it installed in was mahogany and it sounded great and 1.5kg, it might get within spitting distance of alder. Back in the eighties, the resident bass expert in my preferred music store in NZ was a Londoner by the name of Steve Hyde. He was heavily into goth/new romantic but died of a sudden heart attack about twenty years ago but he and I shared an interest in the UK music scene at the time. His first bass was a Shergold Marathon which he'd repainted by bombing it with spray cans of flourescent green, purple, pink and blue paint. I really loved that paint scheme and always wanted to do one of my own but mine will be slightly different (no green) and have a clear 2k lacquer over the top. Partscaster #2: Something heavier. The second body weighs 200g more and features slight figuring over the body. There is a strong temptation to leave it as natural, at least in the beginning until I see how much the body pops. I had a guitar tutor at high school who had a late 70's/early 80's Schecter Partscaster with all brass hardware and a mahogany body. So I was thinking about going down the gold route as it might look nice against the warmth of the body and neck. Don't know though - the biggest hurdle will be finding a Chinese made gold anodised HSH pickguard. But for the electronics I've pretty much decided to go with Dimarzio FRED in the bridge and Air Zone in the neck for jazzier sounds with something from my parts department for the middle single coil (a cheap Powered by Lace stacked humbucker which will need a black pickup cover I expect). I'll probably get a prewired harness and modify it for a push pull vol for coil splitting both the humbuckers and maybe figure out a cost effective method for getting neck and bridge in the middle position. After I've fixed the neck and body as far as possible and finish sanded to about 400 grit, I'm going to experiment sealing the grain with CA. The one great thing about all of this is that locally sourced parts are between 50% to 90% the cost of what I might pay in the UK. So there's room to play around and change things later if I don't like them. Right now, I've sourced an eighteen quid router, the router bits and clamps for mere pence and now need to get some MDF plus epoxy putty from which to make neck heel and pocket templates. Then I'll be in a position to plan the remedial routing.
    1 point
  41. Just sold a Godin Slimline Classical to @Al B. Great comms, swift payment, a pleasure to deal with. A scholar and a gentleman.
    1 point
  42. I have an original late 80s Kramer Nightswan (black in good condition). I am looking at selling it but am not sure what it is worth. I have only seen the reissued Nightswan on eBay etc. and the odd original one for sale in the US with wide variations in asking price. Any ideas on the value please?
    1 point
  43. My rig at cost of £280 and man, it rocks!!
    1 point
  44. So what does it sound like? In the hands of a bass player who was in the wrong place at the wrong time , like this: 188268471_1082340528960452_8640598449057920688_n.mp4 Sunday afternoon jangliness created by using both pickups. The Duncan Distortion (bridge) and Warman P90 (neck) when played together have the curious effect of cancelling out a lot of bass frequency giving an almost Telecaster sound that I really like. At the end I play a few chords on the bridge pickup , then neck and finally back to both.
    1 point
  45. I understand what you're saying, but if you look carefully there is definitely some editing going on. Keep a close eye on the saxophonist and the woman behind him at around 3:16 -3:17.
    1 point
  46. Our Eldest did the same, using CA as a finish for his first electric Build ... ... over a wood stain. It took a couple of weeks, working outside, with disposable gloves, as the stuff is pretty toxic. The finish is superb, and unlikely to wear. Some practise on gash wood is required, to get the right rhythm for applying the CA, rubbing it around, moving on, repeat... and it took about a dozen coats to build up the effect. (There are no plastic parts used; the binding, pick-up surrounds, even the toggle switch cap, are hand-made wooden parts. The inlays are mother of pearl, the nut a beef bone. ...)
    1 point
  47. Only ones i have at the moment, probably dont do it justice.
    1 point


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