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Advice for a learner

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Hi there, first time poster😀

So, I'm a constant guitar plateau-er!  I've had many occasions in my years where i pick up the guitar, learn more chords, learn certain tabs and then seem to plateau!

I've promised my self this year I'm trying to approach it differently, rather than play (easy) song by (easy) song (im very much a 'good' beginner!!), i'd like to get into the theory as much as I need.  

In terms of where I want to get, I'm interested exclusively in acoustic, possibly some classical (instrumentals only,can't sing!!).  At the moment it feels daunting to learn it "properly", so trying to work out the best way...

So, that said, theory, acoustic - cvan anyone suggest any decent resources (online, youtube, books etc) to get me started?

Any ideas much appreciated!!  👍

 

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For online stuff I’m liking the Justin Guitar course which has stuff for all levels and ability. 

I’m in a similar position to you in that I practise quite a bit, make a step forward and then plateau. My next step will be to go and get lessons again from a real tutor. The online courses are okay but I think I need to be challenged by another person.

I’m also toying with the idea of trying to get into a band doing some rhythm guitar stuff. My bass playing moved on dramatically when I joined a band as bassist as I had to learn songs I wouldn’t otherwise have looked at. I figure that if I can get into a band (or even just a jam partner) my guitar playing should improve in the same sort of way.

Or maybe not but I won’t find out if I don’t try!

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Posted (edited)

If you learn classical guitar after a few weeks with lessons you can read simple sheet music and know where the major notes are at the beginning of the guitar neck. That is all I did with my £20 Classical guitar. Apparently if you learn for a few years you understand the theory but it's costly getting lessons and is a big commitment.

After a long time I now know you have to play the piano before learning the guitar because the guitar music scale has the same 12 notes as the piano scale and the same theory. On the piano you can see the theory laid out on the keyboard which is a massive benefit.

What nobody teaches is why there are white keys and black keys and why some intervals are semi tones. I think I got that down now. I realised after looking up 'Just Intonation' on Wikipedia. Nobody would ever want to discuss that with me.

You need 4 things to be good on guitar:

 - Timing (counting ability) (that is 1 2 3 4 , 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and, 1 e and a 2 e and a three e and a four e and a, and always strum with strumming arm, so  strum fresh air when not playing notes)

 - Rhythm (can negate counting ability. I used to think that anyway but now I'm not so sure)

 - Skill (moving between chords fast. Also getting a good sound out of the amp)

 - Theory 

 

I hope that helps. What level are you? You might be best off learning the Major scale on the piano keyboard, and then asking someone to show you the pentatonic scale on the keyboard, to show you Major chords and Minor chords on the keyboard, and to play the piano briefly.

 

Edited by BoppingT
I edited to put more in.

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Did any of the advice work? Or are you a better guitar player than me? I think tons of people are better than I am, I more or less just strum along and play the odd riff.

The teacher in the first link above who is the American woman is useful for the theory. The second video which is massive on the page is useful but I think it lacks the piano to explain.

If you play bass that goes a long way, as apparently rhythm, timing are covered. Theory and Skill are difficult, but with an electric guitar it's easy to make chords and not get finger pain, and there are only a handful of chords, as need the 7 major chords and the 7 minors.

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Steve Stine is a fantastic...gifted teacher.  The way he explains things just sinks into my head with no effort and he tells you why things are the way they are as well as what they are.

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lol Kiwi I'm glad for you that you dig Steve Stine / if I got it wrong that you think he's an alright teacher.

I got the maths down of why the 1st 3rd and 5th notes work together, as it is to do with cos waves getting added. I can put the maths here if you want, I can't follow the maths that well, but can see what result it turns out.

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On 27/03/2020 at 05:51, Kiwi said:

Steve Stine is a fantastic...gifted teacher.  The way he explains things just sinks into my head with no effort and he tells you why things are the way they are as well as what they are.

Kiwi, do you think my guitar advice is any good?

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On 28/03/2020 at 01:52, BoppingT said:

lol Kiwi I'm glad for you that you dig Steve Stine / if I got it wrong that you think he's an alright teacher.

I got the maths down of why the 1st 3rd and 5th notes work together, as it is to do with cos waves getting added. I can put the maths here if you want, I can't follow the maths that well, but can see what result it turns out.

I'm more or less numerically dylsexic. Basic arthimetic and stats are OK...they're grounded in the real world.  But calculus and quadratic equations...might as well be a foreign language.  But if you understand maths and can visualise it, I'm sure you will have few problems. Bach was of the same view.

2 hours ago, BoppingT said:

Kiwi, do you think my guitar advice is any good?

My opinion isn't important and in any case, it takes more than some text to be an effective teacher.  There is sensitivity/empathy and the ability to make complicated things really simple. Compartmentalising information into bite sized chunks is key. And the ability to make learning entertaining either through personality or through staying close to the students' own passions.

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FWIW I'm self taught, I look for songs that interest me and I try to learn how to play them.  Steve Stevens, Steve Lukather, Alan Murphy, Boon Gould, Nile Rodgers...I follow their leads. I don't need them to teach me if I can work out what they are doing with the help of online chord charts.

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Posted (edited)

I think the maths is difficult to visualise also, but if you use the frequency domain instead of the time domain, for me it is at least possible to see how the frequencies cancel out. The maths is possible to follow for people with maths degrees quite easily probably. I am no bach unfortunately. I self taught myself also but had a few half hour lessons. I looked at online videos, but most teachers don't go into the theory.

Paul Davids is good at teaching. Signals Music Studio channel on YouTube is also good.

Edited by BoppingT

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I've seen some videos just now which explain music theory so they're definitely available.  I actually took up guitar to help me understand more about chords to help my bass playing.  It didn't work, I started to find guitar more interesting than bass.

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I am going to learn arpeggios one day, just not any day soon. I think you are supposed to learn these arpeggios first

3 Note ones

1 3 5 (all chords - which means E and A to me)

1 b3 5 (all chords - again the only shapes I generally move are E and A so that is all I'm learning as I don't want to think about it too much)

1 2 5 (sus 2 for E and A shape)

1 4 5 (sus 4,  for E and A shape)

1 1# 5 (add9 for E and A shape)

4 Note ones

1 3 5 7 (Maj 7) (E and A shapes)

1 b3 b5 b7 (Min 7)  (E and A shapes)

Dom 7?  (E and A shapes)

I don't know what other arpeggio types there are. I think arpeggios are either 3 or 4 notes of a chord of a chord consisting of different notes. Anything more than 4 notes becomes a full blown scale. eg pentatonic.

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Try inversions.  Drop the 5th lower than the root so it effectively becomes a 4th. 
 

 

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